Economic impact of the NBA Lockout?

There is always that question of the economic impact sport has, and the common answer given by economists is that there is little/no economic impact from sport on a region.  The research done in peer reviewed journals backs this up, and it has been something which has been discussed here any number of times.

Thus, I was pleased when I came across this post at NBC’s ProBasketballTalk blog today.  They note that there is no economic impact of the NBA lockout, as the discretionary income used to buy tickets will go to other goods and services in the community.  However, they do note a group that is hurting from the lockout, workers at Orlando’s Amway Center where the magic play.  The article states:

(Community Food & Outreach Center director, pastor Scott) George estimated that between 40 and 75 game-night workers have used the Community Food & Outreach Center’s services over the last few weeks. He said he’s unsure of the exact number because some game-night workers are afraid that if they say something, they might not be able to go back to their jobs when the lockout ends.

While this is less than ten percent of the workers for the Amway Center, and we don’t know how many of these workers already go to the Food and Outreach Center in the first place, it does highlight that it is the little guy/business that is often affected negatively by the lack of games.

I remember earlier this year THE SAME author at NBC’s ProBasketballTalk posted an article making the claim that the Lakers losing early in the playoffs would cost the Los Angeles economy $70 million.  This all traces deeper to the words of an economist, who actually notes that the loss could cost downtown business near the Staples Center around $70 million.  Of course, this doesn’t mean that LA is losing $70 million, but that the spending might be redistributed among other parts of the city/region.  Again, those who would be hurt would most likely be those business such as bars and restaurants that depend upon game traffic and large numbers of fans to help boost business.

I’m hoping that more of those in the media are paying more attention to what the academics have to say about economic impact and sport, though I’ll keep watching to see if NBC is keeping a new consistent message.

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