Devils in Trouble

August 8, 2013

The New Jersey Devils of the National Hockey League (NHL) are reported to be in severe enough financial trouble that the league is considering taking over the team.  Current owner Jeff Vanderbeek, a former Lehman Brothers executive, was not able to meet payments on his newly restructured loan which was suppose to help ease payments.  Forbes reported earlier this year that the Devils have are more than $230 million in debt, which is around the amount that the Atlanta Thrashers were in debt before they were purchased and moved to Canada.  Curiously, Forbes is also reporting that the NHL does not want the Devils to declare bankruptcy as the Phoenix Coyotes did.  Rather, they are going to try and take control of the team and then help find a new ownership group to takeover the Devils.

The takeover seems to have some logic to it, as we have seen teams like the Los Angeles Dodgers get taken over by Major League Baseball to get rid of incompetent ownership and management.  The Dodgers were bought out at a major profit, and the team somewhat rejuvenated.  While I do not think there will be any “mega” offers for the Devils, the franchise has won Stanley Cups in recent memory, and was once one of the dominant clubs in the NHL.  With the league taking over the team, they may be losing out on the $25 million they are currently owed from Vanderbeek, as well as the $55 million in salaries that are due to players this season.

While it does not surprise me that another team has had such financial troubles in the NHL, to see one in one of the larger markets in the league may be a sign of several things.  It could be poor management from a financial perspective, an owner trying to bite off more than he can chew, or it could be that the metro area cannot support that many professional hockey teams.  In any case, this will probably be another point in the argument by the owners to get an even larger split of the revenue the next time they negotiate a collective bargaining agreement.


Is the NCAA in danger?

January 30, 2013

The NCAA attempted to have a court case filed by former players thrown out in court.  The former players led by Ed O’Bannon want to recoup some of the broadcast right fee revenue that has only been shared by the NCAA and member institutions.  This initially focused on re-broadcasts of games, but now a new ruling from Judge Claudia Wilken is signaling that players (former and current) can go ahead with their antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA.  So what does this mean exactly?  If, and that is still a big if, but if the NCAA loses this lawsuit, it could mean that the face of collegiate sport as we know it could change forever.  It would also mean that the NCAA could be held liable for hundreds of millions (or even billions) of dollars in revenue to be paid back to former student-athletes.  That would be in addition to having to potentially split some of the broadcast revenues from here on out with student-athletes in those events.  If such events were to transpire, this could mean that many programs which need their current level of revenue from broadcast right revenue would find themselves short of money, and that they would probably find themselves in the red.  I would anticipate athletic departments either going into the red, or making cuts to many programs on campus in an attempt to stay financially stable.

What would all of this mean?  It would be a major sweeping change in athletics, and the financial and economic structure of how the NCAA and member athletic departments do business.  It would also make things more interesting as it would push forward the discussion of whether a student-athlete is an employee or not.  Many argue both sides of this, with discussion of whether the National Letter of Intent which all student-athletes sign is a contract or not.

This is still in its early stages, and is sure to be battled in court for quite some time.  With that said, I’m sure many in the NCAA and athletics are probably sweating a bit after today’s ruling.


Quick Update: NHL Lockout Official

September 17, 2012

Greetings, last night the National Hockey League (NHL) officially locked out players, making this the third lockout of Gary Bettman’s tenure as league boss.  I find it absurd that someone would be allowed to be the commissioner of a league after two lockouts, but now his leadership has presented us with a third one.  Of course, he really works for the owners, so as long as he is keeping the thirty or so super rich individuals across North America happy, he will stay in his job.

On Saturday, Bettman continued in doing his work for the owners when the league told the head of the players’ association (Donald Fehr) to not even bother trying to get a last minute face-to-face meeting to try and bring the sides to a compromise.  Granted, this may have been a waste of time as the sides are still too far apart on any deal happening.  The players had already taken a 24 percent cut in salaries to end the previous lockout in 2005, now the owners want the players to drop the percentage of revenues they share by around 8 to 10 percent.  The players weren’t going to agree to this, the Collective Bargaining Agreement was thus allowed to expire, and thus we are now in a lockout.

In my opinion the league has continued to slash costs, the previous time the league had some good arguments to reduce costs, but this time around it seems as if they just want to slash costs because they can.  The NHL is scheduled to begin play in October, but that seems to be in doubt as there is no way a deal will get done in time to get players to training camp and ready for the season by then… unless those players bolt to Europe.  The exodus has already begun, Evgeni Malkin has already left to play in the KHL in Russia.  The KHL was well prepared and set out rules about the number of players from the NHL a team can sign during a lockout, and that the salaries can’t exceed 75% of what the player makes in the NHL.

Already several players are headed over to play in Europe which makes me think that with other revenue sources for many players readily available, this lockout could last a long time. One wonders if this could be the end of the NHL as we know it.


The NBA looks like it will be back just in time for Christmas

November 26, 2011

That’s right, after all the fighting between various groups that was highlighted in several posts here at the blog, the NBA owners and players association has come to a handshake deal after a 15 hour bargaining session lasting Friday and Saturday morning.  If the deal is accepted (they only have a handshake deal at the moment), the league is scheduled to begin play on December 25th, Christmas Day.  Reports coming in are saying that the first game will be a rematch of the finals, with Dallas playing Miami.  I don’t know if it the Holiday season that got the two groups together again to get a deal, but the owners are claiming that it wasn’t time or the calendar which was forcing them to get things done.  Really, it seems that the mounting financial pressures on both sides was what really helped get to the point where they are at now.  As ProBasketballTalk (NBC Sports) notes, the owners were not looking forward to losing an entire season of revenue, and the players were not looking forward to losing an entire season of salary.

So now that it looks like the NBA will be back, there is still the question of how long it will take for fans to get back into the league.  Research shows that attendance and fan interest in professional sport leagues tends to drop off after the league goes through a lockout.  And this was no short lockout, it lasted 149 days, and was the end point of almost two years of negotiations.  The NBA looks to overcome one big hurdle, but the new obstacle which may cause a drop in revenues is the lack of interest from consumers.  I’ll be curious to see how many people show up to games once it starts back up.


Will the new NBA season proposal hurt London Olympics Basketball?

November 11, 2011

The final deadline that David Stern put into place for the union to accept the owners proposal about the CBA or else things would get progressively worse.  Yet, the two sides are still at the table, which seems to indicate either than David Stern’s threats convinced the union, or that this was a shallow threat and that both sides have ignored as they made progress in talks.  In either case, things seem to be moving in a positive manner in the NBA CBA negotiations, though both sides still have distance between them.

The players are still moving towards decertifying the union today, and agents don’t like the new proposal either because it takes away their power.  Of course this means that many agents are telling the players to not agree to the new deal, and keep fighting the owners.

David Stern has proposed that if the deal gets done soon, the NBA could play a 72 games season (only losing 10 games off the schedule), including full playoffs, and would end only about a week later than the previously proposed season.  So how do you get in that many games in that little of time?  You obviously give players a much tougher and grueling schedule.  As ProBasketballTalk notes, its pretty much a schedule packed like sardines in a can.

This causes some issues I think.  First, with a tight schedule and shorter rest periods, players are likely to be more prone to injuries and fatigue.  This could actually be costly for some players who are required to play certain number of games for bonuses in their contract.  Really by playing a 72 game season, the NBA owners really look like they are trying to recoup as much lost revenue as possible.  If you look at tennis this year, there has been an increase in the number of injuries because of them playing one of the toughest schedules in history.

Then comes the Olympics.  Now that NBA stars play in the Olympics, it becomes worrisome that some NBA players might have to play a very hard schedule and then head to the Olympics with less time to rest and prepare.  I wonder if this might effect basketball at the Olympics in a negative manner.  Many star players might choose to sit out (or be injured) to just try and recover in time for the next season.  While it is only one week in difference from the previous cycle, the scheduling and number of games in such a short amount of time is the real issue.  The body can only handle so much.


The NBA season is slipping away…

November 9, 2011

Today is supposedly the deadline for the owners and players union to come to an agreement over a new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).  The talks have been going on, with the owners having made what is said to be their final offer.  The union side said they would like to negotiate some more on this final offer, and the league (aka David Stern) flat out told them that they accept this or else the owners will start making progressively worse offers as the season gets shorter and shorter, and the pool of money becomes smaller.  The players’ union did not take too kindly to this, and one of the lawyers even said that David Stern was running the players and the league like it was a “plantation.”  David Stern fired back in a brief war of words, the players union lawyer eventually made a public apology and called Stern to apologize in person.

This is just the tip of the iceberg in what seems to be a battle which is really becoming more and more malicious.  Players going after owners (Derek Fisher essentially said Michael Jordan should sell his team if he can’t make money), owners attacking players, players attacking each other, things seem to get worse with each moment.  Now, while Stern has said that they will not move away from the final offer, it has been reported that Stern does have the authority to tweak the deal somewhat.

Really, it would seem that with such a large pool of money at stake (literally billions of dollars for both the owners and players side), they have come down to arguing over about $100 million worth of difference.  Of course this is a large sum of money, but if this was split among players, it would be about $250,000 a player.  We are now entering the final hours before the league potential cancels more games (they are saying you can wave goodbye to the Christmas Day games now) and even just flat out cancel the entire season.

Many more players are said to be preparing to go play overseas as the situation is rather dire.

College Basketball may be the big winner out of all of this.  Everyone looking for their basketball fix will probably tune in to NCAA games, especially as the NCAA basketball season is ready to tip off this week.


Will the NBA close down for a year?

November 4, 2011

I’ll be honest, I don’t things are looking good for the NBA right now with their lockout situation.  As you can read in previous posts here at the IJSF blog, the NBA collective bargaining agreements (CBA) negotiations have been at a deadlock.  All indications from the talks that are going on today is that the owners are angry over having lost a lot of money, and that they want to make up this money by sticking to their guns and having a 50-50 revenue split with the players.  Included in this group of hardline owners is former NBA great himself, Michael Jordan who is now a franchise owner.

50 of the leagues 400 players are preparing to start the process of decertifying the union over the weekend if the talks are still stalled.  This would mean that the labor talks would basically be hitting an end, and the legal battle which would most likely follow, would probably end up canceling the season.

Of course, this is not the best scenario, so a federal mediator will be in the negotiation room on Saturday to try and help them work out a deal.

One interesting post I read was from ProBasketballTalk, which noted several hockey players talking about the NHL lockout and the regrets they had.  Players in this article discuss the lost wages and playing time, and how many of their careers were never the same after the lockout.

People are saying “get it done”, but it doesn’t look good for the NBA, and both sides are set to lose out on a lot of money.


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